Thursday, March 30, 2017

Charity Block #4: Sherbet Seersucker


I tried a new stitch pattern for this next WUA! charity block, and I absolutely love it.

It’s called the seersucker stitch. I found the pattern hereknitpurlstitches.com has loads of different stitch patterns you can do with just (you guessed it) the knit and purl stitches. I’ve written the pattern out a little differently here, just so it’s easier to follow when making this particular square.

Now, this stitch pattern is really squishy, which I love, but which also means that I had to change the number of cast-on stitches for this block. If your gauge is closer to 4.5 stitches per inch, you definitely want to cast on 34 stitches like I did. If your gauge is closer to 4 stitches per inch, you can stick with casting on 30. This just makes sure the block has enough give to stay squishy when it’s sewn to the others, without having to be stretched much.


What you’ll need:


  • Size 8 needles
  • Worsted weight acrylic yarn -- I used 3 colors of Red Heart Super Saver that together reminded me of rainbow sherbet, hence the name of the block. I didn’t have enough of any of the colors to make their own blocks, so they got to team up on this one. You can see from the photo above that even though they are the same brand of worsted weight yarn, each color had a different gauge. It doesn't affect this project so much, but it's a good visual reminder of why we should check our gauge each time, even if we've used this brand/type of yarn before.

Skills you’ll need:




Cast on 34 stitches (or 30 if your gauge is lower, see above).
Row 1: k1, p1, repeat to end
Row 2: k1, p1, repeat to end
Row 3: p1, k3, repeat to last two stitches, p1, k1
Row 4: p1, k1, *p3, k1, repeat from * to end
Row 5: k1, p1, repeat to end
Row 6: k1, p1, repeat to end
Row 7: k2, *p1, k3, repeat from * to end
Row 8: p3, k1, repeat to last two stitches, p2
Repeat these 8 rows until block measures 9 inches from cast on edge, changing colors at 3 inches and 6 inches if desired. Bind off.


I love the texture of this stitch, and I’m already thinking of other projects I can use it in. What do you think of it? Let me know in the comments!




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